Stories

Workington celebrates opening of a new ‘Bee Happy Garden’

On Wednesday 23rd August, Workington Green Community Hub celebrated the long-awaited opening of the new ‘Bee Happy’ garden in Vulcan Park.

The unique wildlife garden was officially opened by the Mayor of Workington Beth Dixon and Mayoress Amy Dixon, in a special event that also saw Cumbria Wildlife Trust on hand hosting a range of fun activities.

After months of careful planning and planting, the garden is now open and packed full of different plants and other items to attract insects and wildlife. -The garden features hedgehog houses, bug hotels, pollinator-friendly flowers, birdhouses, feeders and baths, and much more. 

The space was created with funding from Cumbria County Council (now the Cumberland Authority) and planted last year, with the town council also using recycled materials from their estate to create the area.

The opening event was organised by Workington Town Council who said: “What a lovely afternoon we have had at the official opening of our Bee Happy Garden, Vulcan Park. Huge thanks to Cumbria Wildlife Trust for hosting the activities for us.”

Visitors on the day were able to engage in a range of insect-themed activities including bug crafts and insect hunting.

The garden is in Vulcan Park, Workington, and can be accessed by the public through the Princess Street entrance next to the Workington Town Council offices.

You can find out more about our pilot hub in Workington here…

Share This Story

More Stories

News

Programme Reflections: David Barnes

David joined our Green Leadership Programme from his project: Ambassadors for the Canal – Canal Lengths Persons (CLP). The CLP Project provides a structured and purposeful opportunity for trained volunteers to support and promote the blue and green environment of the canal, towpath, and neighbouring areas.

Read More »
News

Programme Reflections: John Harrison

John is the founder of Solidarity Farm CIC, a working farm in Northumberland that works with young people struggling with mainstream education. Using farm and nature-based activities, it provides a non-judgemental space for young people to be themselves and connect with nature.

Read More »